Redundant Worker Support – a minefield simplified (Outplacement)

October 30th looms and signals the end of the UK furlough programme. It’s done a lot of good and bought companies and employees time to check out how the land lies – but it will bring with it some inevitable worry and pain, not just for those employees on the wrong end, but also the people making the decisions about who’s going – and breaking the news. It’s not pleasant. I’ve done it and telling somebody their position is no more is hard because it’s not their fault. Bloody virus!

Having said that, any sympathy that’s going deserves to be heaped on the receiver of bad news, not the giver. They are going to have it tough, firstly in adjusting to a new reality (as if there’s not been enough ‘adjusting’ this year), then facing up to finding a new job in a tough market.

If you’ve been made redundant:

As somebody who has run outplacement programmes (‘Outplacement’ is a support programme companies can buy in to support loyal staff as they look to define and design a new future – but more of that later) here are a summary of my practical tips on what the redundant employee should be doing.

  1. If you’re newly redundant, you can feel sorry for yourself and get drunk, but only once – but do not pick up the phone. Do not go on social media. You may say something you’ll later regret. It may be understandable, but don’t do it.
  2. Take a few days to adjust. Don’t do anything knee-jerk. Let the fug clear.
  3. Don’t put the green “Open to Work” badge on your LinkedIn picture – you’ll become part of a herd. Your job is to stand out for who you are and what value you can deliver your next employer
  4. Think about your dream job. Is this a chance to chase the job you’ve always hankered for? Desperation is driving the candidate market down. If there was ever a time to elevate yourself, this is it.
  5. If you’ve not updated your CV since lockdown, do it now. Covid has turned the context for the world of work upside down. What applied in 2019 is now out of date. Employers need agility and multi-taskers, so set yourself in that framework.
  6. Emphasize your skills and make sure you make it clear they’re contemporary and relevant to 2020 and beyond. Be careful how you present your experience. It carries the risk of presenting you as somebody for last year, not this, and there’s a big difference.
  7. Be honest with yourself, do any of your skills need a polish? Do something about that now. There’s loads of stuff on YouTube for free. You’ll be surprised what you can pick up for free.
  8. Don’t chase everything. Pick and choose what you want and make your approach personal and relevant.
  9. If you need a CV template, we can let you have one for free. Simply email us at info@recruitmentsoutheast.co.uk

For the employer:

If you’re an employer, you may be worried about the cost of using an outplacement service, but support to people who are leaving can take many forms. It could just be having their CV and LinkedIn profile re-drafted, through to consultations with a specialist. There’s a wide range of options available but come the second half of October your options may become limited as there’s a limited stock of suppliers.

Any outplacement support is a good way to demonstrate a real duty of care – and that’ll be spotted by people not being made redundant and by customers. It could add some extra polish to your brand at a difficult time.

If in doubt, don’t just sit and wonder. Talk to somebody. Talk to us. Understand your options. You have choices that aren’t just about costs, but that could have immediate benefits in terms of moving on to your new challenges more quickly, as well as the positive impact of morale of those staying with you on your journey.

If you’d like a confidential chat as an employer or candidate please contact:

Mandy Purdie             01424 830000             Email mandy@recruitmentsoutheast.co.uk

Martin Ellis                 07823 887982             Email martin@recruitmentsoutheast.co.uk

Graphic :Bank of England prediction of unemployment levels Oct 20 -23 once Furlough Ends Graphic :Bank of England prediction of unemployment levels Oct 20 -23 once Furlough Ends